LiminalIrish design at the threshold

ID2015.


Mourne Textiles &
Notion

M

Part of
Liminal
Milan
April 14-19

NY

Part of
Liminal
New York
May 15–18

D

Part of
Liminal
Dublin
Nov 20 -
Dec 30

Share Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on Google+


Mourne Textiles

Mourne Textiles

Mourne Textiles

Irish heritage brand Mourne Textiles is a family business started in the 1940s in a workshop at the foot of the beautiful Mourne mountains by Norwegian design pioneer Gerd Hay-Edie, using traditional weaving techniques on custom-made handlooms. Gerd’s name became a staple in mid-century British design through long collaborations with Robin Day for Hille & Co. and Terence Conran.

The Mourne Milano Rug, originally commissioned by Robin Day, won the silver award at La Triennale di Milano in 1951 and is just one of the recently re-issued pieces in the collection. Gerd’s unique tweed fabrics were celebrated within the fashion industry when they were shown as part of Irish designer Sybil Connolly’s 1956 collections and were supplied to design and retail emporiums such as Liberty of London, Hardy Amies and House of Lachasse. Gerd’s daughter Karen Hay-Edie and grandson Mario Sierra are building on the legacy of Mourne Textiles for the 21st century. They continue to design and source much of their yarn from Donegal and custom-dye to match the heritage pieces and iconic designs that sprang from the company’s Irish-Scandinavian roots. Gerd’s designs are revived in vibrant tones and rich textures in a lifestyle collection that includes blankets, throws, shawls, cushions, tableware, rugs and upholstery fabrics.

mournetextiles.com

Fondato nel 1940 in un laboratorio ai piedi delle bellissime montagne di Mourne da un pioniere norvegese del design Gerd Hay-Edie, il marchio Mourne Textilex di eredità Irlandese usa tecniche di tessitura tradizionale su telai fatti a mano su misura. Il nome di Gerd diventa un elemento basilare nel desing Inglese di metà secolo attraverso lunghe collaborazioni con Robin Day for Hille & Co e Terence Conran. Il tappeto di Milano originariamente commissionato da Robin Day vinse il premio d’argento alla Triennale di Milano nel 1951 ed è solo uno dei pezzi della collezione rimessi in vendita. I disegni di Gerd rivivono attraverso toni vivaci e ricchi tessuti in una collezione che include coperte, copriletto, scialli, cuscini, stoviglie, tappeti e rivestimenti in tessuto.

Notion

Notion

Notion

Notion was founded in 2009 by Marcel Twohig and Ian Walton and in 2013 went on to launch its own in-house product brand, NTN. Marcel Twohig has a background designing consumer electronics and digital devices for leading global consumer brands. Having worked both as an in-house designer and as an external consultant, Marcel has gained a deep understanding of the role of design and the value that it brings. His work has received numerous industry awards including iF, Red Dot and Good Design.

Ian Walton studied Industrial Design in Dublin and Helsinki and went on to work in diverse roles from freelance interaction designer to a senior design position in an international consultancy. During this time he brought products to market for several international consumer brands. Over the past decade Ian’s work has featured in publications and competitions including Time Magazine, Red Dot, iF, Design Week UK, the Institute of Designers in Ireland.

designbynotion.com

Lo studio di design industriale Notion ha lavorato sia con piccole start-up che con aziende mondiali di design, con un ampio portfolio che dimostra il loro approccio flessIbile e applicabile al design. Il piccolo team di designer usa la filosofia del design industriale basata sull’ideare mentre si produce, disegnando tutto dagli orologi a un sistema remoto di riscaldamento per la casa.


Mourne & Notion

Mourne Workshop

Mourne Textiles &
Notion

Mourne Textiles & Notion

Mourne Textiles in collaboration with Noation

notion-chair

Mourne Textiles in collaboration with Noation

Mourne Textiles in collaboration with Noation

Collaborative Process

At the core of the collaboration is the relationship between hand and machine, the combination of production techniques and the qualities found in each yarn. The Mourne textile designs play on the relationships between
the different fibres used and how they feel and look when used together. The Mourne and Notion teams discussed the differentcharacteristics of the textiles, deriving from the looms on which they are woven, and the benefits and limitations of each. Mourne Texiles were pleased by the appreciation and understanding of their work shown by Notion, who in turn were fascinated and inspired by the unique Scandinavian Irish heritage of the Mourne fabrics. The introduction of handwoven Mourne textiles brought a heritage and tactility which directed the evolution of the new furniture pieces. The geometry of the seat pan and table top – fully CNC machined from French ash – and the aluminium legs act as contemporary counterpoints to the textiles. Mourne and Notion discovered similarities in their approach to design and potential ways in which their collaboration can progress, combining the industrial with the traditional and developing this relationship into the future.

Materials

Hang table and Frame chair: CNC Machined Ash hardwood, anodized aluminium legs, PET foam, Mourne textiles.
Mourne Milano Rug: hand woven on a linen warp using wool and hand twisted fleece.
Mourne Check Furnishing Fabric: 50% wool 25% cotton 25% linen
Mourne Mist Furnishing Fabric : 70% wool 30% cotton
Mourne Cushions – 50% wool 25% cotton 25% linen
Merino Cushions – 100% merino wool
Throws – 100% merino wool


Interview

Mario Sierra
talks about the rich history and association between Mourne Textiles and Milan

I was looking through old newspaper clippings about the workshop and I found a quote by my grandmother, from 1956. She’d said “out of the past flows the future,” and it was almost as if she was saying it to me today. We’re in a lovely part of the world, right on the edge of the Mourne Mountains, and although I grew up here, I don’t take it for granted. I’d left to go to art college in the UK, and coming back, I appreciated it even more.

I did a lot of travelling, and studied textiles at college, but I had itchy feet, and the idea of coming back to the Mournes permanently didn’t immediately appeal. But that’s changed, and even though I’m back and forth to London a lot, it’s lovely to be here, involved in weaving again.

Gerd Hay-Edie, my grandmother, was an amazing woman, she was very influential during my childhood. At the age of six my mother built a small house next to the workshop where I spent my early years. While the house was being built I slept in the workshop on a makeshift bed between the looms.

After school, the workshop would be my playground, I’d build dens, make spaceships out of the old cardboard yarn cones, generally getting in the way of the weavers...
Gerd came from Norway, she worked in Huddersfield before the war and lived and travelled in Shanghai, Calcutta and Hong Kong before settling in Ireland. The Milano Rug came about when Robin Day asked her to create a piece for his room display at the Triennale di Milano, 1951. “Of all the rugs which I have seen, only yours have got the character enough as a background of my new designs of furniture,” he wrote. It won a silver medal that year.

My mother, master weaver Karen Hay-Edie, has been involved in the running of the workshop from an early age, designing and weaving rugs to commission. We recently brought the Milano rug back into production, and now it goes back to Milan for Liminal. There’s something poetic about the way it has all worked out. My mother and I are working through the archives, bringing designs back into production. The fabric structure and textured yarns used come from the archives, but the colours and feel are evolving for today’s market. We’ve also taken on new apprentices. The workshop is really buzzing. The Mourne Textiles workshop began with The Milano Rug, so it’s now come full circle.